Rounding numbers in Google Sheets

Decimals in your spreadsheets can be big or annoying, depending on where they appear. While it is recommended that you use as many decimal places as possible to ensure the accuracy of the calculation, you may not want to display a number with eight decimal places as the final result.

Google Sheets has a handy rounding feature that allows you to determine the number of decimal places displayed and automatically clean up your numbers.

Contents
  1. Google Spreadsheet Function ROUNDUP
  2. ROUNDUP syntax and arguments
  3. Summary of ROUNDUP functions
  4. Google Spreadsheet ROUNDUP Example: Step by Step
  5. Example: Using the ROUNDUP function in Google Sheets
  6. Data entry
  7. To access the ROUNDUP function
  8. Entering Function Arguments
  9. Using a rounded number in calculations

Google Spreadsheet Function ROUNDUP

The image below shows examples and explains some of the results returned by the Google Sheets ROUNDUP function for the data in column A of the worksheet. The results in column C depend on the value of the argument count – more information below.

ROUNDUP syntax and arguments

Function syntax refers to the layout of the function and includes the function name, parentheses, and arguments.

Syntax for the ROUNDUP function:

= ROUNDUP(number, count)

Arguments for the function:

number – (mandatory) value to round

  • This argument can contain the actual data to be rounded, or it can be a cell reference for the location of the data on the worksheet.

count – (optional) the number of decimal places to leave

  • as argument count omitted, the function rounds the value to the nearest integer

  • for example, if the argument count set to 1, leave the function only one digit to the right of the decimal point and round it to the next number

  • as argument count negative, all decimals are removed and the function rounds that number of digits to the left of the decimal point

    • for example, if the value of the count argument is set to -a the function removes all digits to the right of the decimal point and rounds the first digit to the left of the decimal point to 10 – example 3 in the image above

    • if the value of the count argument is set to -2 the function removes all digits to the right of the decimal point and rounds the first and second digits to the left of the decimal point to 100 – example 5 in the image above

Summary of ROUNDUP functions

ROUNDUP function:

  • used to decrease a value by a specified number of decimal places or digits;

  • will always round up the rounded number;

  • changes the value of the data in the cell – unlike formatting options that let you change the number of decimal places displayed without actually changing the value in the cell;

  • affects the calculation results as a result of this data change.

  • always rounds off from zero. It is assumed that negative numbers, even if they decrease in value by a function, are rounded up (examples 4 and 5 in the figure above).

Google Spreadsheet ROUNDUP Example: Step by Step

Example: Using the ROUNDUP function in Google Sheets

As you can see in the image above, this example uses the ROUNDUP function to decrease the number in cell A1 to two decimal places. Also, the value of the rounding number is increased by one.

To show the effect of rounding numbers on calculations, the original number and the rounded number are then multiplied by 10 and the results are compared.

Data entry

Enter the following information in the highlighted cells.

  Ячейка   Данные  
A1 - 242.24134
B1 - 10

To access the ROUNDUP function

Google Sheets doesn’t use the function argument dialog boxes found in Excel. Instead it has a field automatic offer The that appears when the function name is entered in a cell.

  1. Select cell A2 to make it the active cell – the results of the ROUNDUP function are shown here.

  2. Enter an equal sign () and then the function name TO ROUND UP

  3. As you type, a window appears. automatic accompaniment with function names that start with a letter R

  4. When the name appears in the field TO ROUND UP click the mouse pointer on the name to enter the function name and open the brackets in the cell A2.

Entering Function Arguments

  1. Place the cursor behind the open parenthesis and select the cell A1 on a sheet to enter a reference to that cell in the function as an argument number

  2. After the cell reference, enter a comma () to act as a separator between arguments.

  3. Enter one after the comma “2” as argument count to enter the number of decimal places for the value in . to decrease A1 from five to three. †

  4. Fill in the closing parenthesis ““ to complete the function arguments.

  5. Click Enter on the keyboard to complete the function.

  6. Reply 242.25 should appear in the cell A2

  7. When you select cell A2, the full function =ROUND(A1, 2) appears in the formula bar above the worksheet.

Using a rounded number in calculations

In the image above, the value in cell C1 has been formatted to display only three digits to make the number easier to read.

  1. Select cell C1 to make it the active cell – this is where the multiplication formula is introduced.

  2. Enter an equal sign to start the formula.

  3. Select cell A1 to enter that cell reference into the formula.

  4. Enter an asterisk

  5. is the symbol for multiplication in Google Sheets. Select cell B1

  6. to enter that cell reference into the formula. Click Enter

  7. on the keyboard to complete the formula. Reply 2,422,413 should appear in the cell C1

  8. Enter the number 10 in a cell B2

  9. Select cell C1

  10. to make it active. Copy the formula to C1 in a cell C2 using the fill handle, or To copy And Insert

  11. Reply 2,422,50 should appear in the cell C2

Another formula results in cells C1 And C2 2422.413 compared with 2422.50

shows the effect of rounding numbers on calculations, which can be significant under certain circumstances.

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